Our Charity

Art in Healthcare is the leading arts provider for health organisations in Scotland. We lend high quality, original artwork to hospitals and other healthcare settings and provide fun-filled art workshops and talks for patients, care home residents and sheltered housing communities.
Find out more about our work at Art in Healthcare.
Donate with JustGiving

Artworks in Collection


2505



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Boy and Pony

by

Pauline Jacobsen

BoyandPony
Boy and Pony by Pauline Jacobsen
Woodcut 7/50
1993
73 x 55 cm

Reg. Number: P456

Print Label Print Label

Picture kindly sponsored by:
In this woodcut, a touching image is depicted. The artist has focused the detail on the pony, softening the silhouette of the boy and creating a sense of protection and love. The pony seems to blend in with the natural grain of the wood, gently nuzzling the boy's hand and radiating trust and loyalty. One would assume that the pair are situated on a beach, as the treatment of the wood creates the illusion of light and movement, an effect which further softens the appearance of the pony. The boy remains faceless and turned inwards, while the pony has more intricate detail to perhaps draw more attention from the viewer. There is a feeling of nostalgia exuded from this woodcut, which takes one to memories from childhood.

This piece was created using a carving on a woodblock: the grain of the wood is still visible to careful observation. It is likely this was created using a press, more popular for woodcut book illustrations.

Pauline Jacobsen is an illustrator, most known for the illustration of 96 page book "Angels" by Adrian Roberts. His stories were inspired by her woodcuts, which she had created previously; "I wrote this text to accompany Pauline Jacobsen's inspiring and beautiful woodcuts." The book is a commentary on 23 appearances of angels in the Bible, describing how God used angels as messengers in biblical times. It was received well, with signed copies being sold for over £200.

"Pauline Jacobsen's woodcuts are a joy to look at again and again, with their technical skill and deep insight." Pauline has had two group shows in Aberdeen Art Gallery in 1997 and 1999, as well as a solo show in 1998.
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Since 1991 our charity has been assembling one of the largest and most prestigious Collections of original Scottish art in the country. These artworks are uniquely available for display in hospitals and other healthcare settings.


Art in Healthcare is truly committed to the important role that art plays in the healing environment but we need your help to properly maintain and build this unique Collection for the enjoyment and benefit of the hundreds of thousands of staff, patients and visitors who view it each year.


With your help we're able to:


Keep our Collection on display in hospitals and care homes
Support young artists at their degree shows
Buy artwork from professional artists
Provide fun-filled art workshops for patients and care home residents
Develop our training programmes for volunteers


Adopt an artwork from our Collection for just £3 a month and you'll receive:


Your name (or a loved one's) written next to your chosen artwork online
A certificate of adoption with a picture of the artwork
Invites to Art in Healthcare's special events
First to view our latest Prestigious Print
Our colourful e-newsletter


"My patients really enjoy looking at our collection. Sometimes they even do an 'art tour' around the premises." ~ Barron Dental Practice


You can adopt an artwork in the gallery, if it hasn't already been adopted, by clicking the 'Adopt Me' button below the picture of the artwork.


Our Charity

Art in Healthcare is the leading arts provider for health organisations in Scotland. We lend high quality, original artwork to hospitals and other healthcare settings and provide fun-filled art workshops and talks for patients, care home residents and sheltered housing communities.
Find out more about our work at Art in Healthcare.
Adopt an artwork
Donate with JustGiving

Total Pageviews

833


Supported by Edinburgh Art Fair