Our Charity

Art in Healthcare is the leading arts provider for health organisations in Scotland. We lend high quality, original artwork to hospitals and other healthcare settings and provide fun-filled art workshops and talks for patients, care home residents and sheltered housing communities.
Find out more about our work at Art in Healthcare.
Donate with JustGiving

Artworks in Collection


2505



Pen & Ink

Inks primarily contain a colourant and a binding agent alongside a number of other substances, including a carrier liquid, that help control the flow and thickness of the ink as well as its appearance when dry. The colourant is either pigment-based or dye-based. Pigments are solid, opaque particles suspended in the ink whereas in the dye-based inks, the colour is already dissolved into the liquid. Although the dye-based inks tend to have a much stronger colour density, they have a tendency to soak into the paper and therefore the ink is less efficient. The ink can also bleed around the edges of an image. To counteract this problem, these inks are dried quickly. Because of the liquid form of the colourant, dye-based inks can be combined successfully with colour enhancing agents to improve the intensity and appearance of the ink.

Inks are usually applied with a pen although artists may use alternative implements. There are several types of both pens and alternatives:

  • A ballpoint pen dispenses viscous oil-based ink by rolling a small hard sphere. The ink dries almost immediately on contact with paper
  • A fountain pen uses water-based liquid ink delivered through a nib. The ink flows from a reservoir through a "feed" to the nib, then through the nib, due to capillary action and gravity. The nib has no moving parts and delivers ink through a thin slit to the writing surface.
  • A dip pen (or nib pen) consists of a metal nib with capillary channels, like that a fountain pen, mounted on a handle or holder, often made of wood. A dip pen usually has no ink reservoir and must be repeatedly recharged with ink while drawing or writing. The dip pen has certain advantages over a fountain pen. It can use waterproof pigmented (particle-and-binder-based) inks, such as, drawing ink, or acrylic inks, which would destroy a fountain pen by clogging. Dip pens are now mainly used in illustration, calligraphy, and comics. A particularly fine-pointed type of dip pen, known as a crowquill, is often used by artists because its flexible metal point can create a variety of delicate lines, textures and tones with slight pressures while drawing.
  • The ink brush is the traditional writing implement in East Asian calligraphy. The head of the brush can be made from the hair (or feathers) of a wide variety of animals. Calligraphy brushes are widely considered an extension of the calligrapher's arm. Today, calligraphy may also be done using a pen, but pen calligraphy does not enjoy the same prestige as traditional brush calligraphy.


Due to the range of inks and implements available, the scope and versatility of pen-and-ink drawings is enormous.

Since 1991 our charity has been assembling one of the largest and most prestigious Collections of original Scottish art in the country. These artworks are uniquely available for display in hospitals and other healthcare settings.


Art in Healthcare is truly committed to the important role that art plays in the healing environment but we need your help to properly maintain and build this unique Collection for the enjoyment and benefit of the hundreds of thousands of staff, patients and visitors who view it each year.


With your help we're able to:


Keep our Collection on display in hospitals and care homes
Support young artists at their degree shows
Buy artwork from professional artists
Provide fun-filled art workshops for patients and care home residents
Develop our training programmes for volunteers


Adopt an artwork from our Collection for just £3 a month and you'll receive:


Your name (or a loved one's) written next to your chosen artwork online
A certificate of adoption with a picture of the artwork
Invites to Art in Healthcare's special events
First to view our latest Prestigious Print
Our colourful e-newsletter


"My patients really enjoy looking at our collection. Sometimes they even do an 'art tour' around the premises." ~ Barron Dental Practice


You can adopt an artwork in the gallery, if it hasn't already been adopted, by clicking the 'Adopt Me' button below the picture of the artwork.


Our Charity

Art in Healthcare is the leading arts provider for health organisations in Scotland. We lend high quality, original artwork to hospitals and other healthcare settings and provide fun-filled art workshops and talks for patients, care home residents and sheltered housing communities.
Find out more about our work at Art in Healthcare.
Adopt an artwork
Donate with JustGiving


Supported by Edinburgh Art Fair